Owen Mapp: Dragons & Taniwha – 50 Years an Artist Carver


27 May – 19 August 2018

Pātaka’s major retrospective exhibition OWEN MAPP: Dragons & Taniwha – Fifty Years an Artist Carver celebrates Owen’s ground-breaking achievements as the country’s first professional contemporary artist carver of bone and the important influence he has had on the many carvers who have followed him.

Future Exhibitions

DANIE MELLOR: Pleasure and Vexation – the strata and spectacle of history

27 May – 19 August 2018

Danie Mellor: Pleasure and Vexation – the strata and spectacle of history will be the first major exhibition of works by this award-winning contemporary Australian artist to be shown in New Zealand. Curated by Pātaka Art + Museum, the exhibition will feature over 20 outstanding works, many large in scale, including some loaned from Australian museum and gallery collections.

Future Exhibitions

Hanne Eriksen-Mapp and Anja Eriksen –
Whānau: 2 Generations – 18000km Apart


25 May – 24 June 2018

Hanne Eriksen-Mapp and Anja Eriksen are mother and daughter. Hanne lives in Aotearoa and Anja lives in Denmark. ‘Whānau’ explores the similarities and differences between their work with jewellery and body adornment although separated by such a vast distance.

Future Exhibitions


PUIAKI – Carved Knowledge


27 May – 19 Aug 2018

Waka huia are carved wooden treasure boxes shaped like a waka. Highly prized by Māori, they were used to store huia feathers and other tapu adornments worn by high-born people. During the late 19th and early 20th Centuries many waka huia were taken from New Zealand and traded or sold on the European ‘Curios and Collectables’ market. This exhibition will showcase waka huia purchased and traded in England and tell the story of their eventual return to New Zealand.

Future Exhibitions

Whiti Te Rā – The Story of Ngāti Toa Rangatira

Opening 27 May 2018


From May 2018 Pātaka Art + Museum is proud to bring Whiti Te Rā! – the Story of Ngāti Toa Rangatira back to Porirua after its showing at Te Papa.

Featuring unique taonga, the exhibition explores the successes, dramatic setbacks, and extraordinary resurgence of Ngāti Toa Rangatira, starting from Te Heke Mai Raro (the Southern Migration) 200 years ago when Te Rauparaha lead the iwi to the Wellington region.

The exhibition follows the progress of the iwi through their economic rise of the 1820s and 30s, and the bitter conflicts with the colonial government of the 1840s and 50s.

Future Exhibitions